Big Data Insights

High level updates and insights from the world of Big Data

For many enterprises, the new year was a time to renew their commitments to modernizing their organizations and implementing different processes and technology to improve operations. One way many IT decision-makers have chosen to do this is by employing big data analytics. The technology has been making waves in the enterprise in recent months, and a new study recently revealed that members of the C-suite are growing more excited about big data.

The Economist Intelligence Unit recently published a survey that looked into the ways companies are applying big data analytics across business units, who is involved in the management of the initiatives and how effective the programs have been. The report included conversations with nearly 400 C-level executives and found that there is an overwhelmingly optimistic view of the use of big data analytics and tools like Apache Hadoop.

Majority of executives find big data beneficial  ​According to the survey, 48 percent of executives said they felt big data was a useful tool for their operations and 23 percent said they believed big data analytics will revolutionize the way businesses are managed.…

As enterprises become increasingly dependent on the amount of data they are able to collect and analyze, they are seeking better ways to process information on a large scale. Analyzing massive data sets quickly helps businesses gain better insights and build a single view of their place within an industry.

Despite the benefits of becoming a data-first enterprise, companies are only analyzing 12 percent of the data they have, according to a  study by Forrester Research.

Below are some of the sectors that stand to gain the most from implementing big data initiatives.

Healthcare Far more medical information can now be collected and analyzed in near real time, which helps doctors improve patient care. Coordinating data from medical records and comparing the results of case studies is essential for hospitals, doctors and health laboratories to gain insights. With so many healthcare devices now connected to the Internet and to each other, researchers are making connections between previously disparate sets of information, leading to breakthroughs in treatment.…

Much of 2014 was spent discussing the possibilities of big data and predictive analysis, but it appears as though 2015 will be the year that many of these plans are put into action. One such initiative, led by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, is attempting to create more effective and efficient cancer treatment by analyzing the data within patients’ electronic health records.

The ASCO, along with software company SAP, are developing a computer network known as CancerLinQ that aims to help oncologists make better decisions about patient care by comparing their cases with those of similar patients. According to former ASCO president Clifford Hudis, the project could potentially change the way routine care is performed for those battling cancer.

Big data analytics provide a better solution Before electronic health records became the norm for health care institutions across the country, the majority of medical research data was collected in randomized trials.…

As software becomes increasingly important to the everyday processes of the enterprise, developers are being relied on more than ever before to create new and exciting programs. A variety of new software trends will play a key role in 2015. Below – and listed in our most recent infographic – are the top seven:

1) Containerization For any business doing work in the cloud, containers are the future. Containerization is the more efficient big brother of virtualization, allowing applications to be packaged and run in containers to provide true portability. Lightweight packages are used instead of full virtual machines and moving complex applications between locations becomes much simpler. Innovations are being made that allow specific parts of an application to be isolated and moved into separate cloud infrastructures to be managed as discrete units while the parts continue to act as a whole.…

Many changes are in store for the world of technology in 2015, but one area that is likely to see major shifts in the coming year is big data. An increasing number of companies are realizing benefits from big data analytics, leading to a number of new trends to emerge. Read on to find out the top three big data trends for 2015!

Increase in unstructured data

One of the biggest trends that will take hold in the coming year will be the growing use of the Internet of Things, leading to a rapid rise in the amount of unstructured data available. The bits of information collected by the devices connected to the IoT, as well as other machine sensor data and human information, will increase dramatically as more hardware becomes interconnected.

“According to Gartner, there may be as many as 26 billion IoT-connected devices by 2020.”

The IoT is poised for massive growth.…

As the quantified enterprise continues to grow, organizations are scrambling to find the tools necessary to collect and analyze the data they create in order to gain business insights. The demand for such capabilities is increasing rapidly, and many companies have started to employ big data solutions.

A recent report by Enterprise Management Associates found that big data analytics are starting to receive much more traction in the enterprise.

Learn More: Advanced Analytic Applications

“The drivers [for big data projects] are evolving on a quarterly, if not a monthly, basis,” said Dr. Barry Devlin, founder and principal of 9sight Consulting, who collaborated with EMA Managing Research Director John L. Myers on the report. “We’re beginning to see trends and similarities as big data goes mainstream. We’re also seeing some surprises. We also probed into data lakes – they’re being dug and filled.”

Enterprises continue to reap the benefits of big data solutions

“More than 60 percent of businesses have adopted a big data initiative.”

The report found that more than 60 percent of businesses have adopted a big data initiative, and nearly 20 percent of those companies report the idea of being data-driven as constituting “a vital part of [their] business.” While there has been a minor decrease in the number of companies that have deployed one or two big data projects, there has been a “significant increase” in companies with three or more, according to Devlin, indicating success with initial programs.…

According to recent estimates by IDC, the global market for big data and predictive analytics services will likely grow to $125 billion in 2015. Use of advanced analytics platforms is also expected to accelerate dramatically in the coming year. Enterprises are utilizing big data tools like Hadoop more frequently as new uses emerge on an almost daily basis. The new year is sure to bring with it an even larger list of big data use cases, so IDC and the International Institute of Analytics released some of their predictions for the industry for 2015.

White Paper: Rise of the Data-First Enterprise

Analysis related to the Internet of Things will grow quicker than ever According to Forbes contributor Gil Press, the IoT analytics market is expected to dramatically increase over the next five years at a compounded annual growth rate of around 30 percent.…

During the government shutdown last year, a variety of vital services were not provided by federal agencies. One such service was the monitoring of flu outbreaks across the country by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Normally the CDC tracks the movement of the flu and other viruses in order to better prepare doctors in certain areas for a surge in patient visits and ensure they are prepared with sufficient supplies of medication. This information could not be provided by the CDC during the shutdown, but the flu doesn’t stop when the government does.

To help fill the void left by the CDC, electronic health record and billing management firm athenahealth volunteered to take over monitoring duties during the agency’s absence. In fact, athenahealth turned out to be an ideal partner for this venture, as approximately 60,000 medical professionals utilize the company’s cloud-based platform, providing a wealth of information to tap into.…

Since the dawn of our species, humans have been interested in the ability to share information with one another. With all of those pictures and stories, there came a need for an effective way to store all that was being shared and thus data management was born. Thousands of years ago, in 2000 B.C., the Sumerians used stone tablets to record historical events and popular stories. Following the Sumerians’ lead, the Greeks constructed the Library of Alexandria in 296 B.C. to hold their massive stores of documents. Approximately 700,000 parchment scrolls of parchment were kept in the library. While the purpose has always remained the same, methods of storing information have grown more sophisticated since the Sumerians and Greeks tried their hand at it.

1900s There were clearly many advances between the Sumerians’ stone tablets and the inventions of the 20th century, but some of the most important steps to get where we are today were taken during this time.…

In recent years, with the emergence of new technology and increased consumer data, e-commerce retailers have had an advantage over their brick-and-mortar counterparts. Online stores are capable of collecting vast amounts of information about customer behavior and are able to leverage that surplus of data to more effectively market their products to specific customers. Amazon was always heralded as the king of this practice, but now physical retailers are beginning to access the same valuable information through the use of Hadoop and geolocation.

When customers enter a store with a mobile device, the signal from their phone can be tracked as they move around the store. Using data analysis tools like Hadoop, retailers can look at patterns in the locational data and see how long shoppers are spending in certain sections of the store, what types of products they tend to view together or what merchandise is commonly viewed at a certain time of day.…

One of the main topics of discussion in the current health care field is how to put the massive amount of medical information to use to improve patient care. There are two main types of data being used by health care organizations today: Retrospective data, which includes event-based information from sources like medical records, and real-time clinical data that is captured at the point of care from medical devices like heart rate monitors. While these two types of data were once used and analyzed separately, modern big data tools like Apache Hadoop are now allowing health care professionals to integrate information from both sets into a single database in order to identify trends.

For example, if multiple patients on the same medication came into the hospital with similar symptoms that are not normally associated with the use of that drug, big data analytics can help to spot the pattern and pinpoint a cause.…

A recently-released report by NewVantage Partners on the use of big data tools by Fortune 1000 companies has found that a growing number of large organizations are adopting the technology.

According to the study, more than two-thirds of executives from those organizations use big data analytics, almost double the amount who reported doing so last year. This highlights the extremely rapid pace at which enterprises are implementing the technology, as 85 percent of respondents in 2012 only had a big data initiative planned for the future but not actually in use.

Currently, the most common use case for enterprise big data initiatives is sales and marketing, with 36 percent of organizations using the technology for that reason. However, an increasing number of groups are utilizing the capabilities of analytics tools like Apache Hadoop to improve security and compliance, as 29 percent of those surveyed reported using big data for this purpose.…

It’s almost impossible to talk about emerging technology without talking about the Internet of Things. The IoT continues to grow more popular, and the network of devices connected to it gets bigger every day. Currently only 300,000 developers have contributed to the Internet of Things, but by 2020 approximately 4.5 million will have added to it. Gartner has estimated that there will be 26 billion devices connected to the IoT within the next six years.

According to estimates by Cisco, the Internet of Things will bring global businesses a net profit of more than $14 trillion. Because of this, a growing number of enterprises have started implementing more IoT-connected devices into their operations. A study conducted by The Economist found that 95 percent of business leaders plan to leverage the technology in some way within the next three years.

According to a report by Gartner, the IoT presents a unique opportunity for organizations to utilize a vast amount of freely existing information to gain business insights.…

While financial firms have always been on the lookout for suspicious behavior that might suggest insider trading, modern organizations are increasingly turning to predictive analytics and big data tools to detect anomalies that stand out in areas beyond an individual’s trading history. In such a heightened regulatory environment, the use of big data tools like Apache Hadoop provide firms with a service that can avoid costly fines and legal trouble.

As organizations collect larger amounts of data from and about their employees, behavioral histories of workers can be analyzed to find situations in which activity has made a sudden change. For example, Mitch Kraskin, founder and CEO of Compliance Science, uses big data tools to perform peer analysis reporting that identifies abnormal behavior within a peer group.

“Very specifically what we are doing is looking at trends within a population.…

As a growing number of people begin to use mobile phones, the data created from the devices can be analyzed and used to help fight the spread of infectious diseases. Nuria Oliver, scientific director at communications provider Telefonica, used mobile data to track the spread of the H1N1 virus in Mexico, for example. According to Oliver, anonymized and aggregated information allows researchers to quantify the impact of public health efforts on the mobility of citizens and therefore on movement of the disease.

With the steady growth of the Ebola epidemic, aid workers are now looking at how to use big data analytics to stop the spread of the virus. The official medical channels through which to fight the virus are growing more strained by the minute. In Liberia, for example, there are only 200 recorded doctors to help a population of 4 million, CNBC reported.…