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Sandbox Deployment and Install Guide

Introduction

Hortonworks Sandbox Deployment is available in three isolated environments: virtual machine, container or cloud. There are two sandboxes available: Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) and Hortonworks DataFlow (HDF).

Environments for Sandbox Deployment

Virtual Machine

A virtual machine is a software computer that, like a physical computer, runs an operating system and applications. The virtual machine is backed by the physical resources of a host. Every virtual machine has virtual devices that provide the same functionality as physical hardware and have additional benefits in terms of portability, manageability, and security.

Container

Containers are similar to virtual machines except without the hypervisor. Containers are applications, such as HDF or HDP, that run in isolated environments for testing, staging and sometimes production. A container is an instance of an image. Containers run directly on the host machine’s kernel, which results in using less memory resources.

Cloud

The cloud is an alternative environment for deploying Hortonworks Sandbox in case users do not have adequate memory available. This approach is similar to using virtual machine management software, except the virtual machine is located in a cloud environment rather than the users host machine.

Outline

The Hortonworks Sandbox can be installed in a myriad of virtualization/containerization platforms. Jump to the tutorial for the platform that you prefer. This documentation applies to both HDP and HDF sandboxes.

  1. Deploying Hortonworks Sandbox on VirtualBox
  2. Deploying Hortonworks Sandbox on VMWare
  3. Deploying Hortonworks Sandbox on Docker
  4. Deploying Hortonworks Sandbox on Microsoft Azure

Deploying Hortonworks Sandbox on VirtualBox

Introduction

This tutorial walks through the general approach for installing the Hortonworks Sandbox (HDP or HDF) onto VirtualBox on your computer.

Prerequisites

Outline

Import the Hortonworks Sandbox

Start by importing the Hortonworks Sandbox into VirtualBox. You can do this in two ways:

  • Double-click on the sandbox image you download from the prerequisites section above.
  • Or open VirtualBox and navigate to File -> Import Appliance. Select the sandbox image you downloaded and click “Next”.

You should end up with a screen like this:

Appliance Settings

Note: Make sure to allocate at least 8 GB (8192 MB) of RAM for the sandbox.

Click “Import” and wait for VirtualBox to import the sandbox.

Start the Hortonworks Sandbox

Once the sandbox has finished being imported, you may start it by selecting the sandbox and clicking “Start” from the VirtualBox menu.

virtualbox_start_windows

A console window opens and displays the boot process. Once the virtual machine fully boots up, you may begin using the sandbox.

Welcome to the Hortonworks Sandbox!

Further Reading


Deploying Hortonworks Sandbox on VMWare

Introduction

This tutorial walks through the general approach for installing the Hortonworks Sandbox (HDP or HDF) onto VMware on your computer.

Prerequisites

Outline

Import the Hortonworks Sandbox

Open your VMWare product and elect to add a new virtual machine.

On Mac OSX:

VMWare Installation Method

Select “Import an existing virtual machine” and click the Continue button.

choose_existing

Choose File…” to browse to and select the sandbox image you downloaded. Click the Continue button.

Next, you’re given the opportunity to save the virtual machine under a different name. If you have no preference in renaming, you can just leave the default name and click Save. You should then see the importing progress dialog:

vmware_import_progress

Once finished, the following screen is displayed:

vmware_finish

Click the Finish button and start your new virtual machine. A window opens and displays the boot process. Once the virtual machine fully boots up, you may begin using the sandbox.

Welcome to the Hortonworks Sandbox!

Further Reading


Deploying Hortonworks Sandbox on Docker

Introduction

This tutorial walks through the general approach for installing the Hortonworks Sandbox (HDP or HDF) onto Docker on your computer.

Prerequisites

Outline

Configure Docker Memory

For Linux

No special configuration needed for Linux.

For Windows

After installing Docker For Windows, open the application and click on the Docker icon in the menu bar. Select Settings.

Docker Settings

Select the Advanced tab and adjust the dedicated memory to at least 8GB of RAM.

Configure Docker RAM

For Mac

After installing Docker For Mac, open the application and click on the Docker icon in the menu bar. Select Preferences.

Docker Preferences

Select the Advanced tab and adjust the dedicated memory to at least 8GB of RAM.

Configure Docker RAM

Load Sandbox Into Docker

Open up a console and use the following command to load in the sandbox image you downloaded from https://hortonworks.com/downloads/#sandbox.

docker load -i /path/to/image/sandbox_docker_image.tar.gz

To check that the image was imported successfully, run the following command. You should see the sandbox docker image on the list.

docker images

Start Sandbox

Download one of the following scripts and save it somewhere on your computer.

For HDP 2.6 Sandbox

For HDF 2.1 Sandbox

Run the script you just downloaded. It will start the sandbox for you, creating the sandbox docker container in the process if neceesary.

You should see something like the following:

start script ouput

The sandbox is now created and ready for use.

Welcome to the Hortonworks Sandbox!

Further Reading


Deploying Hortonworks Sandbox on Microsoft Azure

Introduction

The Azure cloud infrastructure has become a common place for users to deploy virtual machines on the cloud due to its flexibility, ease of deployment, and cost benefits. Microsoft has expanded Azure to include a marketplace with thousands of certified, open source, and community software applications and developer services, pre-configured for Microsoft Azure. This tutorial covers deploying the Hortonworks Sandbox offering via the Azure Marketplace.

Prerequisites

Outline

Find Hortonworks Sandbox on Azure Marketplace

Go to Microsoft Azure Marketplace and enter “Hortonworks” into the search bar. Submit, and the Hortonworks Sandbox product should appear as shown in this screenshot.

Select "Hortonworks Sandbox" from the bottom view.

Select the Hortonworks Sandbox product and its Overview will display. Click on Get It Now to start the setup process.

Select "GET IT NOW" to begin the setup process.

If prompted, sign in to Azure Marketplace. Afterward, you’ll be asked to confirm your selection, as shown below.

Select "Continue" to continue the process.

Creating the Sandbox

An explanation of the Hortonworks Sandbox will come on the screen. When ready to begin the deployment process, select Create from the bottom of the screen.

Select "Create" on the bottom of the screen.

Fill out some basic sandbox configuration settings. Scroll down for an explanation of the different fields.

The basic configuration page with filled-out fields.

The different fields:

  • Name: This is the name you want to use to reference the machine. In the example above, we use the name “MySandbox”
  • User name: The name of the user account that will be used to log into the machine. Throughout these tutorials, we will use azure as the user name.
  • Authentication type: By default, the machine will be deployed and allow you to connect via SSH key or password. In this example, we opt to use a password.
  • Subscription: The subscription to deploy the machine under. Select one already in your list.
  • Resource group: The name of the resource group to create, or use an existing one. Here, we create a new one with the same name as the machine itself.
  • Location: Which region in the Azure offering to deploy the machine to.

Note: Make sure to write down or remember your username and password. If using SSH, ensure you have the corresponding private key. Otherwise, you will not be able to log in to the machine.

The next step is to choose a size for the virtual machine. It is recommended to use a machine with A4 specifications, or higher.

Select a size for your virtual machine.

Optional settings to configure. You can safely leave these at their defaults.

Optional settings for the machine.

Look over the summary and continue when ready.

Summary of the deployment settings.

Alright, we’re ready to deploy! Review the offer details and purchase when ready.

Review the offer details.

Once the offer is submitted by selecting Purchase, the sandbox will take a few minutes to set up and deploy. After deployment is complete, we can move on to connecting to the sandbox.

Set a Static IP

Once the machine is deployed, it’s overview will appear on the screen. Find the sandbox’s public IP address and click on it.

Find the machine's IP address.

Clicking on the IP address will bring up the IP configuration panel. Select Static as the Assignment, and then make sure to save your changes. This will keep the sandbox from changing IP addresses each time it’s rebooted.

Set the machine's IP to static

Configure SSH Tunneling

SSH tunneling allows us a way to port forward securely, without actually opening the machine’s ports for the entire world to access. Follow these steps to access the endpoints of your Azure deployment from your computer.

Using SSH

Use your favorite editor and edit your ~/.ssh/config file. For example:

vi ~/.ssh/config

Enter the following configuration, replacing the HostName IP with the public IP of your instance. More forwardings can be entered via the LocalForward directive similar to the ones displayed here.

Note: Spacing and capitalization is important.

Host azureSandbox (or any other host alias)
  Port 22
  User <your-specified-azure-username-here>
  HostName <your-azure-public-ip-here>
  LocalForward 8080 127.0.0.1:8080
  LocalForward 8888 127.0.0.1:8888
  LocalForward 9995 127.0.0.1:9995
  LocalForward 9996 127.0.0.1:9996
  LocalForward 8886 127.0.0.1:8886
  LocalForward 10500 127.0.0.1:10500
  LocalForward 4200 127.0.0.1:4200
  LocalForward 2222 127.0.0.1:2222

Save and close the file. Now SSH into the Azure machine by using the Host alias we just created, by using the command below. This will connect automatically using the IP address specified in the config file.

ssh azureSandbox

You’ll be asked for a password, which is the one you set during initial configuration on Azure.

That’s it! Keep this SSH connection open for the duration of your interaction with the sandbox on Azure.

Using PuTTY

Open PuTTY. A window titled “PuTTY Configuration” will open. In the left sidebar, navigate to “Connection > SSH > Tunnels” as shown in the picture below.

Putty Tunnels

We want to add a forwarded port. In the “Source port” field, enter 8080. In the “Destination” field, enter 127.0.0.1:8080. Click on “Add” to add this port forward. Do the same for the following common sandbox ports, plus any custom ones you would like.

8080 -> 127.0.0.1:8080
8888 -> 127.0.0.1:8888
9995 -> 127.0.0.1:9995
9996 -> 127.0.0.1:9996
8886 -> 127.0.0.1:8886
10500 -> 127.0.0.1:10500
4200 -> 127.0.0.1:4200
2222 -> 127.0.0.1:2222

Next, in the left sidebar, navigate to “Session” as shown in the picture below.

Putty Session

In the “Host Name (or IP address)” field, enter the Azure IP address from the previous section. Make sure that the port is set to 22. Finally, click on “Open”.

A login window opens.

Putty Tunnels

Enter the user name you specified during Azure deployment (in our case, we used the login azure). You’ll be asked for a password, which is also the password you specified during deployment.

Splash Screen

Now that you’ve port forwarded by following the tutorial linked above, you can explore the sandbox as you see fit. Point your browser to http://localhost:8888 for the sandbox’s splash screen.

Sandbox registration form

Fill out the form and hit Submit to access the sandbox.

The sandbox splash page.

That’s it! Keep this SSH connection open for the duration of your interaction with the sandbox on Azure.

Summary

You can now access all forwarded ports by pointing a browser to http://localhost:portNumber. For example: http://localhost:8888 will connect to the Azure machine and sandbox over port 8888.

SSH tunneling allows us a way to port forward securely, without actually opening the machine’s ports for the entire world to access.

Further Reading

Now that you’ve got HDP up and running, check out our other tutorials to learn how to leverage its power.